Skeletons say joint disease is not about aging – it comes down to activity

Saturday August 19, 2017

New research has says the prevalence of osteo arthritis within the knees of humans has bending because the mid-twentieth century – and never because we are living longer.

Dr. Ian Wallace, a postdoctoral research fellow within the Department of Human Transformative Biology at Harvard College, studied over 2000 skeletons from three different periods of time to be able to achieve that conclusion. He checked out 176 prehistoric skeletons, and much more from both early industrial era and also the publish-industrial era, which incorporated examples in the early 2000’s. Modern examples were more prone to have knee joint disease than either number of older skeletons.

That which was really surprising was that Dr. Wallace discovered that the rise in joint disease was there even when he controlled for the truth that we are living longer, and also the general rise in weight problems in modern occasions, that is a risk factor for osteo arthritis. Dr. Wallace thinks probably the most apparent candidate to describe the rise in knee osteo arthritis may be the modern decline in exercise.  This does mean that osteo arthritis might be more avoidable than formerly thought.

How come scarring persist when cells renew?

This week’s Quirks Question involves us from Sandra Pilgrim, who asks: 

“If our cells are continually renewing themselves, how come scarring from injuries or surgery persist?”

To reply to this, we arrived at Dr. Saeid Amini Nik, an assistant professor within the Department of Surgery in the College of Toronto, as well as works together with Sunnybrook Hospital’s Trauma, Emergency and demanding Care Program.

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Working night shifts may trigger cancer by hindering DNA repair

Wednesday June 28, 2017

Working the graveyard shift could be pretty miserable. And not simply because you are awake when buddies and family are sleeping and you’re anxiously to rest when they are awake. There’s good evidence that regular night shift work is yet another serious health challenge. You face an elevated chance of cardiac arrest, stroke, as well as certain kinds of cancers.

Now new research is showing this appears to become linked to an essential natural hormone you might have heard about – melatonin. Melatonin helps regulate our sleep and wake cycles – our circadian rhythms. But Dr. Parveen Bhatti, an epidemiologist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, in addition to in the College of Washington in San antonio, finds it may also make a difference in order to our cells cope with the type of damage that can result in cancer.

Paper within the journal Work-related and Ecological Medicine: Oxidative DNA damage during night shift work