Guinea Pigs Harbor a concealed Health Risk

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News Picture: Guinea Pigs Harbor a Hidden Health HazardBy Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Sept. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Been searching for any need to turn lower your son or daughter’s pleas for any pet Guinea pig? Nederlander researchers repeat the rodents may carry germs associated with serious pneumonia.

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The bacteria, Chlamydia caviae (C. caviae), normally causes pink eye in guinea pigs.

But three adults within the Netherlands finished up hospitalized for pneumonia after connection with guinea pigs led to their infection with C. caviae.

Two three patients needed to be placed on a ventilator in intensive care units (ICUs), although the 3 survived following treatment with antibiotics, doctors reported.

C. caviae wasn’t formerly referred to as a bacteria that may infect humans, stated charge author from the report, Dr. Bart Ramakers. He’s a rigorous care physician with Bernhoven Hospital within the Netherlands.

“Doctors and veterinarians should know the bacteria, especially now we have shown that it may be transmitted from guinea pigs to humans,” Ramakers stated. “The bacteria has been detected in rabbits, dogs and horses.”

Dr. Steven Gordon, chair of infectious disease in the Cleveland Clinic, stated the instances really are a indication to rehearse good hygiene around pets.

“We like our pets, but we have should be smart about pets and pet hygiene,” Gordon stated. “You should be washing our hands after pet contact, and certain high-risk people — like individuals with compromised natural defenses — should avoid connection with pets.”

The 3 installments of C. caviae-related pneumonia made an appearance during a period of around three years, and involved two ladies and a guy within their early 30s treated at different hospitals within the Netherlands. The term “cavia” is Nederlander for guinea pig.

The 2 individuals who arrived within the ICU had guinea pigs as pets, and individuals pets have been sick with respiratory system signs and symptoms. The person had two guinea pigs, while among the women had 25, researchers stated.

Another lady labored inside a veterinary clinic, where she looked after guinea pigs struggling with pink eye and nasal inflammation.

Doctors detected Chlamydia bacteria in samples attracted in the patients and figured it had been Chlamydia psittaci, a bacteria transported by wild birds that’s recognized to cause a kind of pneumonia known as psittacosis, Ramakers stated.

However, further DNA analysis revealed the existence of Chlamydia caviae within the sick people, Ramakers stated. Case study also matched the DNA of C. caviae within the patients’ guinea pigs towards the bacteria which had infected its owner.

Not every guinea pigs carry C. caviae, however, many likely do, Ramakers stated. An early on study found the bacteria’s DNA in 59 from 123 guinea pigs with eye disease.

It’s likely there are other installments of pneumonia available brought on by this bacteria, Ramakers stated. Antibiotics work well against it, and many cases most likely obvious up without doctors making the effort to identify the particular bacteria infecting patients.

Don’t hand out your preferred pet guinea pig at this time, though. Gordon stated the instances reported in the present study are extreme examples. Many people will shrug off contact with the bacteria in their normal immune response.

“Many guinea pig proprietors are uncovered for this virus, but couple of are likely to develop signs and symptoms to begin requiring hospitalization,” Gordon stated. “They are outlier cases in severity.”

People who wish to safeguard themselves is deserving of their guinea pigs treated with a vet if their pet seems ill, especially if it’s struggling with pink eye or respiratory system illness, Gordon stated.

“In case your pet is sick, it ought to get noticed,Inch Gordon stated.

The brand new report was printed within the Sept. 7 publication of the Colonial Journal of drugs.

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Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All legal rights reserved.

SOURCES: Bart Ramakers, M.D., Ph.D., intensive care physician, Bernhoven Hospital, Bernhoven, holland Steven Gordon, M.D., chair of infectious disease, Cleveland Clinic, Ohio Sept. 7, 2017, Colonial Journal of drugs

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