News Picture: Antidepressants During Pregnancy Safe for Baby: Study

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WEDNESDAY, June 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Expectant moms, if you are taking an antidepressant it will not help make your newborn cranky or at greater risk for other issues, researchers report.

Northwestern College researchers divided 214 new moms into three groups: individuals having a mood disorder who weren’t utilizing an antidepressant individuals who have been going for a serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) antidepressant and individuals with no mood disorder who weren’t with an antidepressant.

At 2 to 4 days after birth, babies in most three groups had similar rates of irritability, difficulty feeding, sleep disturbances and respiratory system problems, the research found. The problems affected 3 from 10 babies in every group.

Rather, preterm birth was the main risk factor for what is known Neonatal Stopping Syndrome (NDS). Babies with NDS get irritated, restless, cry excessively and could be rigid and have tremors.

A lot of women fear that taking antidepressants while pregnant will harm their fetus.

“Most women that are pregnant are naturally likely to worry much more about their baby’s health than their very own, and can forego taking an antidepressant to prevent these neonatal signs,” study first author Amy Yang stated inside a college news release.

“However with the data out of this study, they may be reassured the baby’s behavior at 2 to 4 days after birth isn’t likely because of contact with medication or depression,” she added. Yang is really a biostatistician in Northwestern’s Center for that Study and Management of Despression Symptoms.

The research was printed lately within the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.

— Robert Preidt

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SOURCE: Northwestern College, news release, June 1, 2017